About Us

Keystone Politics is a liberal-leaning news site that has been covering Pennsylvania politics since 2004. We are fiercely independent and we call out members of either party, but our hearts are set on creating a more liberal Pennsylvania. Articles and commentary are written from that point of view.

Contributors
We’ve had many contributors over the years, and this is our current crew:

Jon Geeting is the Editor of Keystone Politics. Geeting is a Philadelphia-based freelance writer, policy wonk, and political activist. His writing on Philadelphia politics and policy issues also appears at Next CityThis Old City, and he maintains a personal blog chronicling his least important political insights, hyper-local Lehigh Valley land use issues, and the freshest rap singles. He is available at jon@keystonepolitics.com.

Jake Sternberger is a recovering/relapsing political professional who has been a contributor to Keystone Politics since 2011. Sternberger covers campaigns and elections for KP, drawing from his experience working on local, county, congressional, and statewide PA races doing field, oppo, comms, and as CM. He is currently a law student. Send emails to jakes@keystonepolitics.com.

Greg Palmer is an occasional contributor to Keystone Politics. He founded KP in 2004 while in graduate school and after taking the site on a hiatus in 2009, brought it back to life in 2011.

Contact Us
You can always contact us at admin@keystonepolitics.com with any questions or to write for us.

Press releases should go to press@keystonepolitics.com so we can assign them to the appropriate editor/contributor.

Ad sales inquiries can be directed to sales@keystonepolitics.com.

5 Responses to About Us

  1. Ken Rainey says:

    Is anybody doing serious, nonpartisan research on H. B. 1776? I was in Harrisburg yesterday to lobby for restoring the general assistance cuts and saw the 1776 rally. At first I was dismissive, but then considered that the property tax has long been viewed by liberals as the wrong way to fund schools. 1776 as it stands would be a disaster because, while relieving angry seniors of their property tax burden, it would create windfalls for very wealthy land owners and would expand the regressive sales tax. The constitutional amendment would make an outdated document worse. But we should try to capture the enormous energy of the anti-property tax movement to at least draft an acceptable alternative. I fear this is just a right-wing get out the vote effort without any serious core.

  2. Chuck Pascal says:

    Hardly can be considered liberal leaning, or liberal, to support every effort to privatize everything proposed by the conservatives, or to take the choices on public officials out of the hands of the voting public while putting that power into the hands of the privileged and connected, but whatever. If you think that’s liberal, you can think it. It just isn’t.

    • Jon says:

      LOL we’ve opposed all of Tom Corbett’s other privatization ideas, but we think we are in good company with the half of the Democratic Party that supports liberalizing the alcohol market. Sticking up for a handful of service providers over the broad interests of the public is unrecognizable to me as a liberal position.

  3. Elaine says:

    Pathetic. Now you have Jake sensor his comments page? Hey Jake you seem to have a lot of knowledge about narcissistic behavior. Why are you advertising your disorder? Don’t have a comments page if you don’t believe in free speech.

  4. Pingback: Replay: Property Tax Swap Creates a Dilemma for Liberals - Keystone Politics

Leave a Reply